Friday, April 23, 2010

Journal of Current Chinese Affairs: A Whole Issue devoted to cross-strait stuff

Dig in! It's all about cross-strait issues. I'll be posting on them over the next couple of weeks. Some great stuff here:


H-ASIA April 22, 2010

Table of contents: 1/2010 Journal of Current Chinese Affairs

From: Dr. Karsten Giese

Journal of Current Chinese Affairs
OPEN ACCESS

Content alert: Issue 1/2010

Cross-Strait Integration - A New Research Focus in the Taiwan Studies Field
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Gunter Schubert: Introduction - Cross-Strait Integration - A New Research
Focus in the Taiwan Studies Field
http://hup.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/198/198

Gordon C. K. Cheung: New Approaches to Cross-Strait Integration and Its
Impacts on Taiwan's Domestic Economy: An Emerging "Chaiwan"?
http://hup.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/199/199

Chun-yi Lee: Between Dependency and Autonomy - Taiwanese Entrepreneurs and
Local Chinese Governments
http://hup.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/200/200

Gunter Schubert: The Political Thinking of the Mainland Taishang: Some
Preliminary Observations from the Field
http://hup.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/201/201

Da-chi Liao, Hui-chih Chang: The Choice of Constitutional Amendments in a
Young Democracy - From Indirect to Direct Election of the President in
Taiwan
http://hup.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/202/202

Ya-chung Chang: A Modest Proposal for a Basic Agreement on Peaceful
Cross-Strait Development
http://hup.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/203/203 [MT-this one, by an ardent Chinese nationalist, is completely loony, undemocratic, and amoral.]

Christopher R. Hughes: Commentary on "A Modest Proposal for a Basic
Agreement on Peaceful Cross-Strait Development" by Chang Ya-chung
http://hup.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/204/204

Jean-Pierre Cabestan: Commentary on "A Modest Proposal for a Basic Agreement
on Peaceful Cross-Strait Development" by Chang Ya-chung
http://hup.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/205/205

Stefan Braig: Signs of Change? An Analysis of Taiwan's December 2009 Local
Elections
http://hup.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/206/206


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6 comments:

阿牛 said...

I've met very few people in Taiwan who hold the opinion that unification with China is inevitable, as you argue. Probably three or four have made that argument to me in many dozens of political discussions.

Rather, as I point out, most simply reject the idea that China will be able to force any sort of unification. This post tried to suggest possible reasons for this rejection.

And I don't in the least demean people who hold that view. I just think it's entirely wrong. Were they making the argument you're making, at least It would be plausible.

Anonymous said...

CHina doesn't have to force anything when nobody in power is going to put up a fight.

kungwan said...

Thanks for the links to the articles. It was good to know that they were free too!

D said...

Re: Chang Ya-chung

Ok, which is worse, a) Chang Ya-chung's ideas, or b) the fact that he clearly doesn't get the irony of using the term "A Modest Proposal" in his title? I'm afraid I have to say (b).

kungwan said...

What is worse is that Chang's "Modest Proposal" reads like an editorial opinion piece on a newspaper like China Post or United Daily- using only 4 works cited! The lack of scholarship concerns me...

Anonymous said...

Kungwan cites lack of citations as a reason to reject Prof. Chang's article, however, this was not a research article, but a proposal based on common legal and diplomatic concepts, so citations are not necessarily useful or needed.

I also think that Prof. Chang's proposal is more revealing than other articles; that it suggests what is more likely being discussed behind the scenes.

Nevertheless, the proposal, if taken verbatim, seems to argue for equal status, which is rather idealistic considering China's imperial history.

If Taiwan possesses an equal position of hard power, then perhaps the arguments in this paper have a chance; but if Taiwan is the weaker party, shouldn't it follow that Taiwan would avoid China as much as possible?