Sunday, September 18, 2005

Axis and Allies on the Big Board


Karl, Malv, and Red A arrived on Saturday for A & A on the Big Board. I'd sure like to report that we had a great game, but the reality is that the game was over in four turns as we chose national advantages, leaving the Allies in command. Lend-lease and invincible B-29s suck. But the beer and friendship were worth savoring. Thanks for comin' over, guys. Next time come earler, so we can get two games in.

UPDATED to add: the night's best comment definitely went to my son, who sniffed at one of Red A's moves: "My father never does that." The uppity (legitimate child) trounced me today with MY MOVES! The nerve of the kid!

Michael

5 comments:

Naruwan said...

You need some of those 'rakes' to move the pieces around.

Michael Turton said...

You know it!

Mark Harrison said...

Is this like "Diplomacy" but set in the 1940s and global, instead of just Europe and 1900? Looks cool.

Michael Turton said...

No, it is more like RISK, but far more complex and flexible in outcomes. Each person plays one nation from WWII. It's nothing compared to DIPLOMACY, which is far more fiendish, but then, we don't have fistfights during the game ("You bastard! Backstabbed me!" MMmmffff!). Unlike DIPLOMACY sides are fixed, Japan is always allied to Germany; US, UK, and USSR always allied. The early version of A & A was roundly criticized for impossible for the Axis to win, but this one is a little better. Even still, it is very hard for the Germans to win.

Michael

Mark said...

It's nothing compared to DIPLOMACY, which is far more fiendish, but then, we don't have fistfights during the game ("You bastard! Backstabbed me!" MMmmffff!).

Oh, yes, I remember the fights. Not the game to play with one's children. They'd be on the therapist's couch twenty years later: "And then in the Autumn of 1902, my dad swiched alliances and took Piedmont ... "